EUROPE IS GOING DIGITAL – A GLANCE AT THE DIGITAL COMPETENCES OF THE ROMANIAN CITIZENS

Authors: I. A. Bogoslov, PhD, Teaching аssistant ORCID ID 0000-0001-5834-8710 Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Sibiu, Romania M. R. Georgescu, PhD, Рrof. ORCID ID 0000-0002-7022-3715 Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Iasi, Romania A. E. Lungu, PhD student ORCID ID 0000-0001-5086-8789 Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Iasi, Romania

Annotation: The technological ascension represents one of the main phenomena encountered by today’s society, influencing almost every field of activity of the modern world. In fact, technology has become part of our daily life, whether we refer to active participation in society, learning, work, or other activities. In order to gain a favorable position compared to other states considered as global powers, the European Union is constantly striving to advance in various fields, placing special importance on the digitalization of the Member States. In addition to the technological side, the process of digitalization takes place with and through the human factor. Thus, we are concerned with the human capital and its digital competences, as their deficiency or absence can have negative effects both on the general life chances of citizens and on the digital progress of EU Member States. 

Romania is striving to make the most of the digital revolution, the possibilities and benefits offered by it, trying to contribute to the digital progress of the European Union and to consolidate its position among the other Member States. However, given the aforementioned issues, it is natural to wonder if citizens’ skills support the digitalization process or represent a shortcoming in this regard. Thus, the fundamental purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the digital competences of Romanian citizens, dealing with aspects such as the evolution of the last years and the current status related to the analyzed phenomenon.

Keywords: Digital Skills, Digitalization, European Union, Romania.

Received: 08/03/2021
1st Revision: 18/03/21
Accepted: 20/08/2021

DOI: https://doi.org/10.17721/1728-2667.2021/216-3/1

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